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A dangerous e-mail tries to hack the data of Gmail, Hotmal and Facebook users

A dangerous e-mail tries to hack the data of Gmail, Hotmal and Facebook users

Hotmail and Gmail users should be very careful of a fake message coming to the Inbox from the Facebook Support team. The scam email, which was highlighted by cyber security experts at Trustwave, claims that a Facebook user's account is at risk of being deleted after it was found to be in breach of established standards. The Facebook user is told to click on a link that is supposed to have a chat with the Facebook support team on Messenger, but it is all just an elaborate scam to steal the user's details and data.

A dangerous e-mail tries to hack the data of Gmail, Hotmal and Facebook users

The Trustwave report highlighted one of the fraudulent messages they spotted, which is labeled 'new message from Facebook'. The email said:

Your page is scheduled for deletion after violating our standards. If we do not receive any notification from you within 48 hours, the page in question will be automatically deleted. You can appeal this action taken below by visiting your support inbox.

The email then has an option at the bottom that users of Hotmail, Gmail, Outlook, and anyone else who came across it should click. However, they are redirected and open a fake Facebook appeal page and a fake Messenger chat, which is hosted by Google Firebase. This is all done to make the scam look more convincing, with Facebook users being asked to provide their full name, email address, page name and mobile number as part of the appeal process.

Facebook users were also asked to provide two-factor authentication details if this was enabled on their account. If Facebook users provide these details, not only could it lead to their accounts being closed, but if they reuse passwords across multiple services, it could lead to hackers getting data for a host of other services.

Thankfully, after Trustwave spotted this scam, the fake Facebook pages linked to the scam and the phishing website have been taken down. But Trustwave said "there is no reason to believe that another threat actor might not use the same tactic in the future."

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